Posts Tagged 'Mobile'

MWC 2013: Fiesta, Siesta or Vista?

The Mobile World Congress 2013 has closed its doors. 1700 exhibitors (+200). 72000 visitors (+7000). But what remains? Fiesta, Siesta or Vista? Was it a party, a nap, or a vision? It depends on the beholder. Some were bored, some excited, and some inspired. We could see the Internet of Things leaving the horizon, cloud computing permeating the mobile network, and a few surprises with user devices.

The Internet of Things, this will be the 50 Billion mobile devices by 2020 as predicted by Ericsson, connected to the Internet, realizing services hosted on cloud computing centers scattered all over the globe. Most of these devices will not be smartphones or tablets, but rather sensors, smart objects and commodities, smart tags, robots, vehicles and the like. It will be machines talking to machines (M2M), and sometimes also to humans. Most of these interaction will be wireless. The result will be Big Data, a gigantic amount of data, constantly growing at incredible speed. Tremendous growth is expected and the ecosystems are starting to evolve. They mainly cluster around the concept of Smart Cities, one of our current big challenges.

New business models start to appear. They are built around the Big Data being collected. Imagine a smart car generating lots of usage data. Insurance companies can generate special tariffs, depending on the type of usage. Some end user will like it, because of the money they can save. A similar principle applies to car maintenance contracts. Even car sharing models such as zipcar become manageable. Your fridge will never be empty, but always contain your favorite food, delivered just in time. You don’t even have to go shopping for it, if you don’t want to. You will always be guided to an empty parking place. You will never miss a train or wait for a long time at the station for a friend to pick you up. Intelligent traffic management systems calculate the optimal route for your car to be there on time. Municipalities will save money while being able to offer better and sustainable service.

To exploit these data and to interconnect services and businesses Service Delivery Platforms are necessary which comply with standards and are able to integrate legacy M2M solutions. The cloud offers M2M-as-a-Service. However, equally important will be the bandwidth available to the users. To be more precise: bandwidth without frustrating quality of service. This type of bandwidth is a scarce resource. Both, the mobile cells and the outer parts of the backhaul often operate at their capacity limits. One of the solutions here are small cells, miniature, short-range base stations. Millions of them. Small cells come as complete packages including multi-mode and management. The end users will neither realize that they are there, nor that they are suddenly connected to one. But they will experience them as the quality of service increases, and the life of their batteries stretches. Infonetics predicts a bright future for these small invisible helpers.

We also saw a paradigm shift for the end user devices. Firefox OS – similar to Google’s Chrome OS – executes HTML5 code without a browser. At the same time this HTML5 app is portable: an app developed for Firefox OS runs as well in a standard mobile browser of other platforms such as Android, iOS or Windows. This is a key differentiator: apps just need to be developed once and execute everywhere, with little or no effort. Even the portation of an existing web app to the new platform is cheap. Firefox OS will start as a cost-effective solution for threshold countries, replacing feature phones by low-cost smartphones. An additional side-effect is that this new OS allows network operators to gain access to the application layer again. They can now create their own app market and can compete with the established OTT ones from Android and iOS.

Need a new phone? Why not considering YotaPhone? One phone, two displays. Half smartphone, half e-reader. A high-resolution liquid crystal display on one side and an electronic paper display (EDP) on the other. If you use it intelligently, you can save a lot of battery.

What is your opinion? Was this year’s Mobile World Congress a Fiesta, a Siesta, or was it Vista? You can discuss it here, or life at Cambridge Wireless.

Autor: Bernd Stahl

MWC 2013: The New Mobile Horizon Comes In Like a Slow Train – It’s Time to Reposition

If we’re coming to the Mobile World Congress this year thinking we’ve got all the answers – or at least some of them – then maybe I need to disappoint us. What we really need are questions. Lots of them. Why?

It is because we are living in the age of disruptions. It is not that they occur every once in a while. They characterize this era. There frequency even increases. They shake everything and everyone, one after the other. There seems to be no end. Many answers belong already to the past, before they have enjoyed a life in the present. Our museums are full of brilliant answers, the dreams and aspirations of even older generations of engineers. But what prevails in this shakeout?

The unshakable. I.e. the resilient, the flexible, the ones anticipating the next move. The ones that have implemented ambitious dreams into their designs, at a time when the majority was laughing at them. The ones having more questions than answers. There are times when questions are more important than answers. Yes, these are our days. Whereas answers sooner or later find their “eternal home” in the museum, questions always have their future in front of them. And, it must be the right questions. It is like George Bernard Shaw once said: “You look at the world and ask ‘Why?’. I dream and ask ‘Why not?’”.

So let’s have a look at the disruptions that our industry created in the past 100 years, say, and see what we could learn for what is ahead of us. When Wireline Telephony was invented and introduced, the delivery boys became obsolete. The required basic technology was circuit interconnectivity. Visionaries like Heinrich von Stephan, who built world’s most advanced telephone system in Germany were laughed at and found themselves in the “Book of Idiots”, which later became the public telephone book. What was the true nature of this disruption and why was its impact so profound? This question is difficult to answer and would fill at least another blog post. So we keep this question to help us guide into the future.

Mobile Telephony extended Wireline Telephony, requiring mobile circuit connectivity. No one further became obsolete this time. Things changed, when Data Communication appeared. Packet communication had quite a few advantages over circuit connectivity. However, the opposite of this statement has also some relevance: for instance the Carrier Grade versions of Ethernet emulate some of the circuit connectivity features. Packet communication gave us the Internet. And the Internet gave us an abundance of information. We suddenly had abundance to such an extent that it required search to be useful. Search was free, of course, and refinanced via advertising. This abundance of information and the corresponding shift in advertising started to make printed products obsolete. What was the true nature of these disruptions and why was their impact so profound?

Then Voice over IP (VoIP) arrived with improved packet communication. Skype and Co. were just cheaper and offered attractive new services in combination with voice. Circuit Wireline Telephony became obsolete. Did voice communication become obsolete? No! International voice traffic has a constant annual growth of 13%, thus compensating price declines at the same rate. This is a stable trend for decades. And it is still true up until 2012, being 490 Billion minutes. However, since 2011 this growth came significantly from OTT voice solutions combined with smart messaging services, increasing the pressure on carrier voice solutions. What was the true nature of this disruption and why was its impact so profound?

In the early 2000’s, Social Communication entered the arena. It required Cloud Computing as the enabling and driving technology. Traditional communication services and techniques became much less important. What was the true nature of this disruption and why was its impact so profound?

The iPhone brought us the breakthrough in Mobile Data Communication. It required even more advanced packet technology. App stores were established, an app economy appeared, and exploded. More traditional communication services became much less relevant. In 2007, UMTS packet data was exploding over UMTS voice. And in 2009, the volume of total mobile packet data was greater than all mobile voice. In February 18, 2013, Booz & Co. predicts a decrease of mobile voice turnover of 5% per year until 2016 to then $ 628 Billion, while the one of data will grow by 9% per year. The annual data volume even grows by 29%. This growth is generated by mobile digitalization, and the bulk of this growth goes to the OTTs. Infonetics reported recently, that the Carrier VoIP/IMS market sees first positive year since 2008. LTE network operators use IMS to implement their voice solutions. But will this ever pay off, as mobile voice has a sustained decline of revenue? And what about Small Cells? They hit the application layer and implement a mobile PABX. Ubiquisys and Quortus demonstrate a small cell based mobile PABX for small and mid-sized enterprises (SMEs). This solution eliminates the need for desk phones, hence making our lives easier. What IS the true nature of these disruptions and why IS their impact so profound?

The marginalization of voice traffic was predicted from the late 1990’s onwards. This seemed to be obvious and inevitable, but the reality was still different. Voice remained a cash cow. Corrective action did not seem to be necessary. But what happened since then? The Telecommunications Operators lost the Application Layer. For 100 years, the Application Layer consisted of voice, fax, telex and the like. Then suddenly the Application Layer became extremely rich and abundant. This abundance was driven by completely new players. Abundance is game-changing. It is so desirable and attractive to the user, that it cannot be hold back. Plus: the disruption of the traditional telephone system by the Internet was also about philosophies “regulated networks” versus a “multistakeholder model”, and of institutions ITU vs. IETF.

Is there a remedy for the Incumbent Telecommunications Service Providers? Will they have a new approach, or just more of the same old same old? Can they reinvent themselves? What will be their new message? Is this message strong enough to drive their change? I really wish there would be one. But honestly, I don’t believe that it is QoS (Quality of Service). It is not the quality of the service that matters; it is the service itself, the application. QoS can only be a stop-gap-solution. The marketing position and the immediate user visibility of the real service is always much better than the just the one of its quality.

And what do we see now at the Mobile Horizon? The nature of a horizon is that it is far away and things cannot be discerned clearly. They seem to be so small. And there appears to be so much time until they arrive here. But what we can already recognize is indeed clear enough. It could be subsumed in the formula M2M & IoT, Machine-to-Machine Communication realizing the Internet of Things. Everything connected, if you like, a new Human-Machine-Society. Do you feel the paradigm shift, again? Our life and work will change, and so will the value chains. Every Next Big Thing starts small. What WILL BE the true nature of these disruptions and why WILL their impact BE so profound? The answers will come. Who will carry them? And, whom will these answers carry? What will constitute the new teams? It is already clear: a new abundance is on the way. Again, it will be game-changing. Again, it cannot be stopped, because it is so desirable.

Business models are currently figured out. This trend is backed up by former Juniper M2M strategist Godfrey Chua joining Infonetics Research. A new nano-scale Chip Design enables the Future ‚Internet of Things‘. This prototype uses solar power and consumes so little energy that its battery does not need to be replaced. Thin and flexible credit-card-size tags can now be developed, which can be attached to common object like books, clothes, furniture, etc., thus connecting those objects to the Internet of Things. M2M protocols such as the MQTT (Message Queue Telemetry Transport) support short intermittent messages which are ideal for IoT applications: connection-less, and sleep & wake communication schemes save battery. This list could easily be extended. Emerging new technologies will transform vertical markets, and they will be mobile: health, transport (cars, trains, ships, planes, space vehicles), energy, learning, payment, homes, cities, etc.

What WILL BE the true nature of these disruptions and why WILL their impact BE so profound? Why not … ?

 

See you in Barcelona. Hall 5 G40.

Autor: Bernd Stahl

Open Innovation-Projekt von Nash Technologies: Mobiles Assistenzsystem für Pflegebedürftige

Durch die Überalterung der Gesellschaft steigt die Zahl der pflegebedürftigen Menschen – eine bekannte Tatsache. Immer mehr können nicht allein und selbstbestimmt leben. Entsprechend wichtiger werden Assistenzsysteme, um beispielsweise Demenzkranken so lange wie möglich eine Unterbringung in einem Pflegeheim zu ersparen.

„Das hat sehr viel mit Lebensqualität zu tun, wenn man länger in der gewohnten Umgebung mit vertrauten Menschen bleiben kann. Dafür werden telemedizinische Systeme entwickelt, um die häusliche Pflege zu verbessern und den Patienten ein Sicherheitsgefühl zu vermitteln. Hier setzt die barrierefreie Gesundheits-Assistenz an, die im Nürnberger Medizintechnik-Cluster Medical Valley unter Beteiligung unseres Unternehmens entwickelt wird“, sagt Nash Technlogies-Kollege Rolf Bittner.

Das Gerät sieht aus wie eine Armbanduhr, um Stigmatisierungen der Betroffenen zu vermeiden. Es überprüft 24 Stunden am Tag den Gesundheitszustand dementer Patienten und sendet die Daten automatisch an einen Gesundheits-Server weiter, auf den Ärzte und Pflegepersonal Zugriff haben.

Nash Technologies ist für die Software verantwortlich. Die Applikation gleicht einem Trichter: Medizinische Sensoren überprüfen die wichtigsten Vitalfunktionen wie EKG und Blutdruck, aber auch die Position des Patienten und senden diese Daten an den Gesundheits-Server. Von dort aus gelangen sie über eine Internetverbindung an das medizinische Netzwerk.

„Mobile Assistenzsysteme für Pflegebedürftige sind heute noch nicht verfügbar. Vielen Herstellern von Medizinprodukten fehlen schlichtweg die technologischen Erfahrungen, denn es handelt sich um ein System der Telekommunikation. Der Anspruch an solch ein Gerät ist sehr hoch. Und genau hier liegt die Kompetenz unseres Unternehmens. Die Datenübertragung muss so stabil und zuverlässig sein wie die Festnetz-Telefonie. Die Daten müssen hochverfügbar sein, in Echtzeit gesendet werden und das System muss extrem skalierbar sein. Die Technik darf also nicht zusammenbrechen, wenn sie von Millionen Menschen genutzt wird“, so Bittner.

Der Netzwerk-Spezialist greift dafür zurück auf die jahrzehntelange Erfahrung, die das Unternehmen in der Telekommunikationsbranche gemacht hat. Für die Datenübertragung hat Nash Technologies Internet-Protokolle mit Mobilfunk-Protokollen „verheiratet“. Durch Optimierung der Informationsübertragung spart das Gerät sogar noch Energie, so dass beispielsweise die Batterielaufzeiten verlängert werden. Nash Technologies verfolgt dabei den Open Innovation-Ansatz als Problemlöser für die Gesundheitsbranche.

„Als eigentlich branchenfremdes Unternehmen sehen wir uns als richtigen Partner an, um die Herausforderung auf der Seite der Telekommunikation zu bewältigen. Ein mobiles System muss ganz andere Aufgaben bewältigen als ein Hausnotruf. Deshalb wird es für die Hersteller von Medizinprodukten wichtig sein, auf externe Expertisen in der Telekommunikation zurückzugreifen“, resümiert Bittner.

Präsentiert wird das mobile Assistenzsystem am Messestand (Standnummer 105) von Nash Technologies auf der MedTech Pharma  in Nürnberg vom 4. bis 5. Juli im NCC Ost der Nürnberg Messe.

Für Interviewtermine und Informationsgespräche bitte Rolf Bittner kontaktieren: Mobil erreichbar unter: 0151 – 5500 3342. Bittner wird auch an unserem Messestand sein.

Mobile World Congress: Small Cell demand is set to skyrocket – “UMTS-LTE Dual Mode is the key to growth”

The Mobile World Congress in Barcelona clearly shows that the market for Small Cells will be gathering significant momentum over the years to come. In fact, Simon Saunders, chairman of the Small Cell Forum, estimates that the numbers of Femto Cells deployed worldwide will be increasing from 3.2 million installed units in 2012 to over 60 million in 2016.

http://www.totaltele.com/view.aspx?ID=471674 “Driven by the Smartphone boom, Small Cells are the cornerstone for the next phase of digitalization for all economic sectors – gearing up to the next upswing in the App economy”, confirms Bernd Stahl from the telecommunications provider Nash Technologies on site at the exhibition in Barcelona.

The small radio cells are clearly way ahead of the conventional bulky masts. “They are considerably more cost-effective, their approval processes are less complicated and they can be deployed specifically where there is a high need for bandwidth and where many users communicate at the same time – for instance in football stadiums, inner-city areas or shopping centers”, says Stahl. The Nash Technologies network supplier develops software for companies that produce radio cells – and is most definitely experiencing high-level interest at the Mobile World Congress: “We are having many discussions about these developments, also due to the fact that the Smartphone wave is leading to a heightened need for broadband Internet, which raises the issue of supply”, adds Stahl. And this is just the beginning: “In the future, when the Internet in the key areas of logistics, traffic, health, energy, etc. leads to wide-reaching process digitalization, demand will become even greater.”

Stahl also adds that the introduction of new technologies inevitably implies a transition phase which is not to be underestimated. Whereas most currently developed Small Cells are equipped with LTE, there are hardly any LTE Smartphones. “For the most part, Internet-compatible mobile phones still run with UMTS. And, from a global perspective, this will continue to be the case for quite some time, especially in population-rich, newly industrialized countries and for most users in developed countries. Consequently, the radio cells, and especially Small Cells, need to be equipped with UMTS as well as LTE to enable the transition phase”, says Stahl. And this is exactly why Nash Technologies is present at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. As a telecommunications provider with decades of relevant experience, the software specialists from Nuremberg know their way around LTE, just as well as the considerably more complex world of UMTS. “It’s going to be all about having the different technologies working hand in hand, providing Smartphone users with a seamless transition between both technologies, without their user experience being disrupted”, says Stahl.

Stahl, the ICT expert, is also convinced that, through the development of Small Cells, the App economy will be experiencing its next upswing. Small Cells may only have small geographical coverage. But this makes for a huge benefit: network operators will be aware of exactly where a Smartphone is located, and specifically at locations where it hadn’t been possible previously, because GPS reception wasn’t available in buildings. “When potentially every small business in a downtown area has its own Small Cell, then there’s simply no limit to what can be done. A new type of location-based Apps will be possible, because a business model will be available to support them. Through new Apps, there will be more web traffic and therefore more growth.” To make sure that this growth is also possible during the transition phase from UMTS to LTE, the UMTS-LTE Dual Mode will be key.

For more information, contact:

Bernd Stahl
Senior Systems Architect
Nash Technologies Stuttgart GmbH
ES/VS/E
Lorenzstraße 10
70435 Stuttgart
Email: bernd.stahl@nashtech.com
www.nashtech.com

iPhone: +49 (0) 160 / 97304915
Tel: +49 (0) 711 / 33501-7573
Fax: +49 (0) 711 / 33501-5403

Blog: https://nashtechblog.wordpress.com/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/NashTechGermany
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nash.technologies

Mobile World Congress: How Femtocells can Move Digitalization Forward

Press Release

Barcelona, 22/02/2012 – With every new Smartphone and every new tablet, potential problems escalate for network providers. They need to keep their mobile communication networks in top shape, otherwise customers could very well drown in data bottlenecks – as they themselves could in prohibitive power costs. “Digitalization of all economic sectors greatly depends on the industry’s willingness to invest”, states IT expert Bernd Stahl from network specialist Nash Technologies. The digitalization of all private and business processes is a megatrend that opens up huge opportunities for innovation and growth.

Hardly a day goes by without a device manufacturer announcing a new product to be launched at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, where the entire mobile communications sector is coming together to further drive the mobile Internet vision while setting new impetus for growth. In Germany alone, over 20 million people already have a Smartphone – and the trend is rising.

“The industry is currently facing three major challenges. On the one hand, network providers have to reduce their energy costs. Also, coverage has to be extended to address more rural areas. And finally, frequency ranges also have to be increased, if market needs are to be covered”, says Stahl. Energy costs arise for the most part through the base stations, which currently remain greatly responsible for supply. “The stations, which are often installed in high buildings or on their own masts, cover wide areas. For them to function sufficiently on the edges of these areas,  performance at their center automatically needs to be excessively high. This draws the balance downwards”, adds Stahl. Moreover, high costs arise through locations that are either rented or purchased.

A considerably more high-performance and cost-efficient solution is available through Femtocells: “The radio cells can be used where there is a high concentration of people – at hot spots in urban centers for instance. They can deliver in a highly targeted way rather than by providing widespread coverage.” For example, football stadiums or shopping centers can be equipped with their own radio cells. As well, they enable more cost-efficient coverage in rural areas.

The reliability factor is also extremely important in the mobile Internet. No one can afford to have their networks malfunction or break down due to overloading or unexpected events. This is even more important in view of the fast-rising numbers of mobile users and their increased need for bandwidth due to innovative Internet services. Femtocells are no exception, they carry their own set of challenges. This is why the specialists from Nuremberg are also showing their “Nash Protocol Tester” in Barcelona, with which Femtocell performance and efficacy can be tested. http://www.nashtech.com/home/products/nptr/

“Femtocells and Small Cells create the technological infrastructure for the ongoing development of entire economic sectors”, says Stahl. The degree of digitalization in certain industries can be as low as 30 to 45 percent. With digitalization, we are referring to communication, closeness to suppliers, process chains and delivery to end-customers – and not only straightforward LTE access. “The trend is crystal clear: what can be digitalized will be digitalized”, says Stahl.

Nash Technologies at the Mobile World Congress, Barcelona, February 27 to March 1, Hall 2, Stand E18.

http://www.mobileworldcongress.com/exhibitor-list/nash-technologies-1

For more information, contact:

Bernd Stahl
Senior Systems Architect
Nash Technologies Stuttgart GmbH
ES/VS/E
Lorenzstraße 10
70435 Stuttgart
Email: bernd.stahl@nashtech.com
www.nashtech.com

iPhone: +49 (0) 160 / 97304915
Tel: +49 (0) 711 / 33501-7573
Fax: +49 (0) 711 / 33501-5403

Blog: https://nashtechblog.wordpress.com/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/NashTechGermany
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nash.technologies


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