Archive for the 'Femto Cell' Category

The Rapid Growth of Carrier-grade Small Cells

Mobile experts predict that carrier-grade small cells will outnumber femtocells in 2016. This trend was the reason for Node-H and Nash Technologies to create a partnership. Nash Technologies’ 3G software now integrates well with the Iuh stack of Node-H and supports as well the concept of self-organizing networks (SON). In this short interview, Mike Cronin, CEO of Node-H and Dirk Zetzsche, Business Development Director of Nash Technologies GmbH discuss the benefits and opportunities of this partnership.

MWC 2013: Fiesta, Siesta or Vista?

The Mobile World Congress 2013 has closed its doors. 1700 exhibitors (+200). 72000 visitors (+7000). But what remains? Fiesta, Siesta or Vista? Was it a party, a nap, or a vision? It depends on the beholder. Some were bored, some excited, and some inspired. We could see the Internet of Things leaving the horizon, cloud computing permeating the mobile network, and a few surprises with user devices.

The Internet of Things, this will be the 50 Billion mobile devices by 2020 as predicted by Ericsson, connected to the Internet, realizing services hosted on cloud computing centers scattered all over the globe. Most of these devices will not be smartphones or tablets, but rather sensors, smart objects and commodities, smart tags, robots, vehicles and the like. It will be machines talking to machines (M2M), and sometimes also to humans. Most of these interaction will be wireless. The result will be Big Data, a gigantic amount of data, constantly growing at incredible speed. Tremendous growth is expected and the ecosystems are starting to evolve. They mainly cluster around the concept of Smart Cities, one of our current big challenges.

New business models start to appear. They are built around the Big Data being collected. Imagine a smart car generating lots of usage data. Insurance companies can generate special tariffs, depending on the type of usage. Some end user will like it, because of the money they can save. A similar principle applies to car maintenance contracts. Even car sharing models such as zipcar become manageable. Your fridge will never be empty, but always contain your favorite food, delivered just in time. You don’t even have to go shopping for it, if you don’t want to. You will always be guided to an empty parking place. You will never miss a train or wait for a long time at the station for a friend to pick you up. Intelligent traffic management systems calculate the optimal route for your car to be there on time. Municipalities will save money while being able to offer better and sustainable service.

To exploit these data and to interconnect services and businesses Service Delivery Platforms are necessary which comply with standards and are able to integrate legacy M2M solutions. The cloud offers M2M-as-a-Service. However, equally important will be the bandwidth available to the users. To be more precise: bandwidth without frustrating quality of service. This type of bandwidth is a scarce resource. Both, the mobile cells and the outer parts of the backhaul often operate at their capacity limits. One of the solutions here are small cells, miniature, short-range base stations. Millions of them. Small cells come as complete packages including multi-mode and management. The end users will neither realize that they are there, nor that they are suddenly connected to one. But they will experience them as the quality of service increases, and the life of their batteries stretches. Infonetics predicts a bright future for these small invisible helpers.

We also saw a paradigm shift for the end user devices. Firefox OS – similar to Google’s Chrome OS – executes HTML5 code without a browser. At the same time this HTML5 app is portable: an app developed for Firefox OS runs as well in a standard mobile browser of other platforms such as Android, iOS or Windows. This is a key differentiator: apps just need to be developed once and execute everywhere, with little or no effort. Even the portation of an existing web app to the new platform is cheap. Firefox OS will start as a cost-effective solution for threshold countries, replacing feature phones by low-cost smartphones. An additional side-effect is that this new OS allows network operators to gain access to the application layer again. They can now create their own app market and can compete with the established OTT ones from Android and iOS.

Need a new phone? Why not considering YotaPhone? One phone, two displays. Half smartphone, half e-reader. A high-resolution liquid crystal display on one side and an electronic paper display (EDP) on the other. If you use it intelligently, you can save a lot of battery.

What is your opinion? Was this year’s Mobile World Congress a Fiesta, a Siesta, or was it Vista? You can discuss it here, or life at Cambridge Wireless.

Autor: Bernd Stahl

Disruptions After the iPhone – Why the Mobile World Congress is Different Today

The iPhone came in 2007. And “to communicate” was since then a six-letter-word. Traditional voice traffic was dominating the mobile networks up to 2007. But then data exploded. Today voice is just a shrinking small margin. Five major forces drive the actors in this huge arena: mobile broadband and small cells, an exploding plethora of smart mobile devices, green wireless, the digitalization of our lives and businesses with its mobile user interface, and finally surprises and disruptions.

In “The Mobile World Congress – A Short History” we identified these five driving forces. Today, we analyze them in more detail, observing their evolution on the Mobile World Congress starting in 2008. This allows us to derive predictions to be checked against the unfolding reality.

MWC 2008:

We know it already; this was year 1 after the iPhone. The MWC got its new name, reflecting the new reality (before it was the 3GSM World Congress). For the first time in history, mobile data traffic surpassed mobile voice traffic, sustained. Mobile voice today is only a very small fraction of the whole game.

One major theme was of course mobile broadband. No wonder: the real smartphones arrived. HSPA and with it mobile TV was taking off with 420 HSPA enabled mobile devices and a $50 Billion global market. LTE presentations and demonstrations were the high-runners. Femtocell companies were maturing: understanding the requirements and offering solutions for interference issues and remote management, while bringing down the costs.

Apple was not present, but hundreds of new types of smartphones were showing features you already knew from the iPhone. Android was only a prototype platform, the user experience being not yet impressive, of course. And Microsoft presented smartphones with Windows Mobile 6, such as the Sony Ericsson’s Slider XPERIA X1.

Green wireless became important with power saving base stations and recycling concepts for mobile devices and batteries. This was necessary, because of the dramatic mobile penetration growth.

Mobile advertising was a hot topic, and considered to be the driving force for rich media mobile entertainment and content, instead of subscription based models. But there was lots of debate as to what percentage of the $640 Billion global advertising market could go mobile and more importantly, how. Social Networking started to become mobile. Increased GPS penetration in handset enabled Location Based Services.

And, we had unexpected heroes. The advent of smartphones shifted the center of gravity away from the Mobile Operators to the Internet OTTs. Plus, Huawei had an impressive presence after a series of European operator successes.

Here you can read more:

Mobile World Congress Report from Barcelona.

Mobile World Congress Draws 55,000 Visitors

MWC 2009:

We write year 2 after the iPhone. The mobile industry stands out as one of the few vibrant sectors in a tumultuous world economy. More than 4 Billion mobile users and 80% of the world’s population areas covered with mobile. The Internet is now mobile.

Mobile broadband and small cells move forward on their path. Early operators announced their LTE suppliers, but deployment was likely not to happen before 2010. HSPA is the cash cow and HSPA+ is slowly taking off. Also Femto Cells where a hot topic, it was not yet clear whether they will really take off.

There was significant growth for the mobile devices, as expected. Smartphones were the high-runner, as universal lifestyle devices. Android smartphones arrived, but only a few. HTC also unveiled several smartphones with Windows Mobile 6.1. And Microsoft presented Windows Mobile 6.5 with a new Internet Explorer Mobile. The future was already present with LG’s prototype of a wristwatch phone. New mobile chipsets integrated application processors with audio/video codecs, video playback, GPS, Bluetooth, WiFi, FM Radio, etc. There are certainly many more innovative smartphone features and apps to come.

Green Mobile continues to increase its relevance with Universal USB Charging and solar-powered base-stations. This is in particular necessary as the next billion of mobile users will mainly come from developing countries. Green is now one of the main buying arguments.

Again Apple was only virtually present, but they defined the rules of the game. The Mobile App Store is becoming a common booming phenomenon, and with it the app economy takes off. Users came back to the networks, attracted by Web 2.0 mobile technologies and mobile multi-media entertainment. Speech and text recognition became relevant to reduce the keyboard bottleneck on handsets. However, there didn’t seem to be much progress on Mobile TV and Mobile Advertising. Nevertheless, applications are clearly in the driver seat, not the pipe: and since then, this is the key to successful business models.

The unexpected heroes of MWC 2008 are still heroes, but no longer unexpected. OTT VoIP à la Skype became an issue after smartphone vendors start to integrate it, building up a threat to traditional operator voice. This was a hot topic for debate. Huawei and ZTE were doing extremely well winning contracts.

We conclude stating, that our 5 big topics progressed steadily and consequently. They drive innovation and disruption. But we did not see additional major surprises and disruptions.

Here you can read more:

Mobile World Congress Report from Barcelona

47 000 visitors at Mobile World Congress 2009

Highlights of Mobile World Congress 2009

MWC 2010:

We are still in the age of the iPhone: year 3. The mobile industry did not really suffer from the economic crisis. We have now 4.6 billion mobile subscribers. LTE is just about to be rolled out. The growing demand for bandwidth has led to capacity problems and discussions over flat-rates.

Android devices really grew. The little green robot was the main topic of the fair. We could call this a breakthrough. It was also the year of Windows Mobile 7, it looked not bad, but turned out to be just another nice try. And there were two other new mobile operating systems: Nokia’s MeeGo and Samsung’s Bada OS; both of them did not last. In total, we saw many new handsets, even more apps and accessories. And one of the coolest things was DoCoMo’s earphones with sensors that could track your eye movement.

The Internet became increasingly mobile. Social Networks were integrated into the smartphone OS and with the local contacts. The app store is still the key to success. Therefore, the leading mobile network operators have started a joint effort to establish a common app development platform. Cloud services such as “Connected Life” of Deutsche Telekom offer a common experience over multiple platforms: phone, computer and TV.

A whole array of new mobile application domains popped up: mLearing, mHealth, mPayment, mobile advertising (finally getting some momentum), and location-based services. Wireless standards such as ZigBee were considered key enablers for the Smart Grid. And, augmented reality was discussed in expert panels. mHealth was seen as one of the main drivers for the M2M market, as smart sensors for remote monitoring could save the healthcare industry up to $200 billion annually.

Security issues became important, as the number of mobile attacks is rising. Hence, prototypes of security platforms were presented to support applications such as mobile payment, secure PIN, secure content management, key management, and user authentication.

Conclusion: the major trends of 2009 continue to gain strength: broadband mobile and Femto Cells, Android, the App Economy, and Green Mobile. Cloud Services appeared and with them many new mobile application domains. Skype was still growing while its usage was slowly allowed by carriers. The disruption rolls.

Here you can read more:

Mobile World Congress 2010 Report

Best of MWC 2010: Highlights From the World’s Largest Mobile Show

Vier Tage Mobile World Congress: Die Highlights der Mobilfunkmesse

MWC 2010: Sicherheitsplattform für Mobiltelefone

MWC 2011:

LTE was starting to be rolled out; promising data rates of 50 Mbps. The advent of LTE drives the mobile cloud market and its apps. HSPA+ still offers a short term substitute with 21-42 Mbps and a HSPA penetration of 400 million connections, growing by 17 million per month.

Again, Apple was not present, but lots of visitors came with iPads. While others have their new pads presented at their booths. More than 700 tablets were announced. 2011 is the year of the tablet. Many were greatly interested in events about the App Economy.

The race of the mobile operating systems and their eco-systems was really opened. The green Androids now fill the market and enter the business space. Android 3.0 runs on tables. VMware presented two virtual Androids on one smartphone: one for business, another one for private use.

Nokia announced collaboration with Microsoft in order to catch up with iOS and Android. The then still largest manufacturer of mobile devices wants to use Windows Phone 7 on their smartphones. This means that Symbian and MeeGo will not survive. However, the real challenges are 8,000 apps in the store vs. 350,000 Apps for iOS and 150,000 for Android. Plus: weak device management and security features for the enterprise.

HTC produced never precedent numbers of mobile devices. LG unveiled Optimus 3D, allowing recording, viewing and sharing of 3D content on a smartphone. However, this turned out more as a gimmick. Also, NFC (Near Field Communication) was announced.

Location Based Services were integrated into social networks, but still the market does not really take off.

2011 was the year of mobile VoIP: Skype’s presence increased, indicating a real take off mobile VoIP minutes, combined with a shrinking amount of traditional voice minutes. OTT voice has arrived.

Conclusion: all trends are intact and robust. We get more of everything in smaller devices.

Here you can read more:

http://www.teltarif.de/mwc-mobile-world-congress-trends-highlights-technologie/news/41608.html

http://www.cartagena-capital.com/news-and-events/market-insights/265-mobile-world-congress-2011-report

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/technik-motor/computer-internet/bilanz-des-mobile-world-congress-2011-barcelona-im-zeichen-der-gruenen-androiden-1594520.html

http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/analysis/2031123/top-highlights-mobile-world-congress-2011

MWC 2012:

MWC 2012 had a strong motto: Redefining Mobile. And it seemed that this was quite realistic. The Mobile Internet is now a vital infrastructure, disrupting one analogue industry after the other. New technologies such as HTML 5 improve App development and start to redefine the App Economy. And, the Internet of Things has left the horizon, approaching us all.

The world still faces major economic problems, in particular in Europe. The mobile industry has reached a volume of $ 1.9 Trillion. Growth in Europe is flat, while being good in the US and ROW. 2012 had 5.3 Billion mobile subscribers globally, representing 77% of the world population.

Mobile broadband increases the cake: 10% increase in broadband penetration leads to 1.3% GDP growth in that country. Mobile Internet becomes a vital infrastructure such as water and energy. LTE is now the fastest growing mobile technology: 50 live LTE networks in 30 countries with 10 million users. Prediction for 2016: 200 live LTE networks in 70 countries with 500 million users, where 90% of all base stations will be small cells. LTE handsets were ready as well: a healthy mobile ecosystem. Network optimization is still very important to fill the supply-demand gap for bandwidth. Solutions: Self-Organizing Networks and Wi-Fi Offload using smart WLAN hotspots.

Again, we saw many new smartphones and tablets. Quad-core processors are the big theme now. There were rumors about Windows 8 phones and tablets before the start of the fair; and about NFC-enabled tablets. The next edition of LG Optimus 3D appeared, but still no real breakthrough. Asus demonstrated the PadFone a very interesting combination of smartphone with tablet as a docking-station. Where are Microsoft and Nokia? There is great talk and great expectations on Windows 8. The smartphone market reached $ 480 Billion, with 49% Android. The operators of emerging markets called for sub-$50 smartphones.

Let’s talk about App development: HTML5 gains momentum, but will not soon replace native apps.

Here is the Internet of Things: again Ericsson predicts 50 Billion connected devices by 2020. This market is expected to then be worth $4.5 Trillion, with $600 Billion for the connected car and healthcare, each.

Increasingly the mobile industry becomes an innovation enabler, with high disruptive potential for other industries. Mobile devices are the user interface for the Internet-Cloud-based digitalization of business and life. This impacts already the media, finance, e-commerce, transportation, energy, and healthcare. And, the car industry opened the doors for the mobile invasion. In particular for mobile money, NFC is necessary to enable this, and commercial deployments were announced in several countries.

The ongoing dilemma of the traditional (mobile) network providers: they lost the application layer, and can’t recover sufficiently. Or better: the application becomes much bigger than voice, and voice is getting increasingly disrupted by OTTs. A real solution for the incumbents is still open and for hot debate. Mobile Messaging and RCS are operator strategies to compete with OTTs. But, can this be successful?

Conclusion: yes, indeed the MWC2012 showed how mobile is going to be redefined, and how it redefines much of our life and business. The growth and the trends were not just more of everything, but new qualities appeared: smarter networks and clouds, HTML5, and the emerging Internet of Things.

Here you can read more:

http://www.msolvepartners.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/mSolve-Newsletter-March-20121.pdf

http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/mwc-2012-all-the-latest-details-1056086

http://www.netzwelt.de/news/91167-mwc-2012-neuheiten.html

See you in Barcelona. Hall 5 G40.

Author: Bernd Stahl

The Mobile World Congress – A Short History

We are writing the year 6 after the appearance of the iPhone. Although Apple was never physically present on the Mobile World Congress (MWC), their presence was always strongly felt in the past 6 years. But how did it all come to pass with this great and leading event?

It started in 1987 as a small fair about mobile communication. For 20 long years it was called “3GSM World Congress”. In 2008, i.e. year 1 after the iPhone, it replaced the “3GSM” with “Mobile”. Since 2006, the mobile world meets at the Fira de Barcelona, and in 2013 for the first time at the Fira Gran Via. Today, the Mobile World Congress is not only world’s largest mobile exhibition, but also a conference where prominent CEOs present their views about the future of their brand. You will meet mobile network operators, device manufacturers, app developers, technology companies, network equipment vendors, and content providers. But don’t be surprised, this list may even be longer, much longer.

The MWC is a big magnet. Its force of attraction is constantly getting stronger. In the years 2007 through 2010 the number of exhibitors stagnated at 1300. Since then, it increases by 100 per annum. Likewise the number of visitors: after a small bump in 2009 and 2010 their numbers grow each year by around 6000. There were 67000 visitors in 2012.

There’s a reason for this attraction. We find it in the history of the MWC. Here are the main messages and trends, since the iPhone arrived:

  • Broadband evolves dramatically into the mobile. LTE is already here growing extremely fast, and driving the mobile-cloud market. Small Cells will dominate the future. The Mobile Internet is a vital infrastructure such as water and energy.
  • There is an exploding plethora of smart mobile devices. A fierce race of brands. Full of surprises and disruptions. These universal devices changed our lifestyle. Sustained. They will soon become much smaller, include unexpected features, and migrate into well-known commodities, such as clothes, wristwatches, glasses, etc.
  • Wireless must be green. This applies both for the network infrastructure and user devices. It is one of the main buying arguments.
  • The digitalization of our life and business has a mobile user interface. And at the core is the Internet Cloud. It’s a big wave. It does not stop. It penetrates and enriches one area after the other: content, entertainment and advertising; social networking; completely new services using our past and current locations; speech and text recognition; health becomes mobile; smart M2M (Machine-to-Machine) devices enable the Smart Grid; they transform our homes, transportation systems, and our finances. The Internet of Things has left the horizon, approaching us all.
  • We saw even more surprises and disruptions. Users migrate from traditional mobile operators to the Internet OTTs (Over-The-Tops). The mobile app store continues to create new facets of the app economy, which did not exist before. Voice becomes a margin in the Internet, increasingly realized by attractive OTT VoIP solutions à la Skype. Operators migrate to Chinese technology from Huawei and ZTE.

So, if you should consider attending the Mobile World Congress in 2013, watch out. These five topics evolve according their own game-changing rules. Mobile Broadband, User Devices, Green, Applications transforming our lives and businesses, and unexpected surprises and disruptions are here to stay.

Interested in more details about the MWC history? Read „Disruptions After the iPhone – Why the Mobile World Congress is Different Today„.

See you in Barcelona. Hall 5 G40.

Author: Bernd Stahl

Alt werden und technologischer Fortschritt?

Haben Sie sich schon mal Gedanken gemacht, wie Ihr Leben nach dem 65. oder 67. Lebensjahr aussehen soll?

Quelle: Gerd AltmannQuelle: Gerd Altmann, Pixelio

Ich meine genauer gesagt. Wie möchten Sie leben wenn Sie ihr Rentenalter erreicht haben? Alleine? In einer Gemeinschaft wie zum Beispiel in einem Mehrgenerationenhaus? Oder möchten Sie erst im Rentenalter noch die Welt entdecken? Oder auch nur zu Hause im trauten Heim verbringen und sich um Familie, Garten und die Folgegeneration kümmern? Oder sogar weiter arbeiten? Also, Ich fände es toll, wenn sich JEDER jetzt schon Gedanken darüber macht, wie er im Alter leben möchte. Was sind Ihre ureigensten Bedürfnisse, die aber vor allem nicht getrieben sein dürfen von Gesellschaft und politischen Beschlüssen!

Ich heiße S. Lehmann (44), in einer glücklichen Partnerschaft, keine Kinder und arbeite bei Nash Technologies in Nürnberg im Marketing. Wie der Firmenname alleine schon verrät, die Firma hat zu tun mit Technologien. Das bedeutet, unsere Firma nimmt teil am technologischen Wandel, jeden Tag, Woche um Woche, Monat um Monat, Jahr um Jahr. Unsere 260 Ingenieure in Nürnberg und Stuttgart befassen sich quasi jeden Tag mit der Thematik, wie sich Datenmengen noch schneller und sicherer von A nach B transportieren lassen oder wie man das Leben noch einfacher gestalten kann. Oder wie wir mit unseren hochqualifizierten Fachkräften und unserem Know-how nutzbringende Lösungen anbieten können, wie z.B. in folgenden Bereichen, Telekommunikation, Gesundheitswesen, Energie und Automotive. Kommunikationstechnologien wie LTE und Small Cell sind zur Zeit in aller Munde – aber was danach kommt, dass kann im Moment noch keiner so genau sagen. Wir können nur spekulieren oder erahnen was sich durchsetzen wird und was gebraucht werden könnte – mehr verrät uns aber auch ein Blick in die Glaskugel nicht! Oder wissen Sie es?

Seit langem ist schon bekannt, dass bis zum Jahr 2050, Japan gefolgt von Deutschland zu den Vorreitern der Bevölkerungsschrumpfung gehören wird und mehr Menschen immer älter werden. Dies wird einige demografische Änderungen mit sich bringen! Der Begriff „Demografischer Wandel“ ist ja fast schon zu einem Modewort geworden, derzeit aber leider durch die Euro- und Finanzkrise wieder stark nach hinten gerückt. Und? Geschehen ist hier noch nicht viel, oder? Das Thema „Älter werden“ geht uns alle an und muss auf jeden Fall noch viel mehr in der Öffentlichkeit und in den Unternehmen vorangetrieben werden! Aber was können wir selber dazu beitragen? Die Lösung: Teilen Sie sich mit, seien Sie kommunikativ, netzwerken Sie was das Zeug hält. Teilen Sie uns Ihre Meinung mit. Mit uns meine ich die Welt um Sie herum. http://www.manager-magazin.de/unternehmen/artikel/0,2828,785939,00.html

Fakt ist auch, die Datenmengen werden immer größer und wollen möglichst schnell, zuverlässig und sicher übertragen werden. Im Umland von großen Städten und in strukturschwächeren Gebieten krankt es immer noch an der Netzabdeckung (Breitbandausbau). Gerade hier findet man viele ältere Menschen. Es gilt also auch zu hinterfragen, was brauchen wir Menschen denn wirklich? Was bringt uns wirklich Erleichterung? Was kann uns im Alltag sinnvoll unterstützen? Das gilt auch für das Geschäftsleben!
Muss ich als Privatmann den Trends denn immer folgen? Ich meine, Ja, denn größtenteils oder gezwungener Massen werden Sie einfach mitgerissen, ob Sie wollen oder nicht. Außerdem ist es doch für Sie von Vorteil, wenn Sie in Zukunft auch noch weiterhin mitreden können, oder? Deswegen, bleiben Sie am Ball, informieren sie sich und reden Sie mit.

Es gibt ältere Menschen, die sich erst jetzt mit 86 Jahren einen Laptop anschaffen und einen Internetkurs an der Volkshochschule belegen – Hut ab für soviel Mut! Ziel ist hier sicherlich in erster Linie, sich mit den Kindern, den Enkelkindern und Freunden auszutauschen. Verstreut sind die Menschen ja heute bereits über die ganze Welt, sei es aus beruflichen, privaten oder politischen Gründen, sei es aber auch nur um den Anschluss an die Gesellschaft nicht zu verlieren. Dieser Trend wir sicherlich weiterhin anhalten. Wir haben immer weniger Zeit und alles dreht sich immer schneller. Ich kann mir vorstellen, das das Wort„Service“ oder Dienstleistung am Menschen in Deutschland wieder einen ganz neuen Stellenwert bekommt. Ich denke aber auch, daß wir da unbedingt wieder hin müssen – Servicewüste Deutschland ade.

Aber jetzt habe ich noch gar nicht verraten, wie ich mir meinen Lebensabend vorstelle. Ich möchte auf jeden Fall bis ins hohe Alter, sofern es der Gesundheitszustand zulässt, mobil bleiben. Das heißt für mich, ein Auto zu besitzen und auch zu teilen, um von A nach B zu kommen. Sollte der Partner irgendwann mal nicht mehr sein, möchte ich nicht unbedingt alleine leben, mich aber auf jeden Fall selbst versorgen können. Denn Selbständigkeit im Alter hält physisch und geistig fit. Für den Notfall oder auch nur für alltägliche Probleme würde ich es allerdings begrüßen, jemanden oder etwas zu haben, wo ich mit jemanden in Kontakt treten kann und sofort jemand zur Stelle ist – eine Person meines Vertrauens. Mögliche Hilfsmittel könnten sein: Geräte wie zum Beispiel eine intelligente Armbanduhr oder ein mobiles Endgerät. Eine stabile Netzverbindung von jedem Ort und eine einfach Bedienung sollte selbstverständlich sein. Gleichzeitig sollten im Hintergrund möglichst viele Informationen übermittelt werden, damit auf der anderen Seite richtige reagiert wird.
www.zukunftsentwicklungen.de/

Auch wenn bis dahin noch viel, viel Zeit ins Land vergeht, es ist dennoch ein Gedanke wert. Man sollte sich nicht treiben lassen und alles dem Zufall überlassen, man kann sein Leben auch selbst aktiv steuern – wenn man jetzt schon weiß was man will.

Mehr als die Vergangenheit interessiert mich die Zukunft, denn in ihr gedenke ich den Rest meines Lebens zu verbringen.
(Albert Einstein)

“We need more radio cells, so that we don’t get stuck in data bottlenecks with iPAd 3 and Google Play”

The next iPad version is being launched in March – this time equipped with LTE, as reported by Chip.de. http://www.chip.de/news/Das-neue-iPad-3-Alle-Details-und-erste-Eindruecke_54525027.html The new mobile communication standard will also be integrated to the next iPhone. At the Cebit show, Vodafone is introducing its first LTE Smartphone. “But what is the real benefit of an iPad 3 with ultrafast technology, if the mobile Internet can’t keep up? We also need a functioning LTE infrastructure in the form of radio cells. This became very obvious at the Mobile World Congress, and now again at the Cebit show”, says Bernd Stahl from network provider Nash Technologies.

Digitalization is in full swing. It is permeating one sector after another and is clearly  unstoppable. It has three pillars: end-devices, Cloud services and what is essentially an ‘adhesive’ for fast Internet. Not only Smartphones and tablets, but also vehicles, energy supply in our homes, as well as household appliances are being made intelligent and networked. The Internet needs to handle these volumes of data, also via wireless. This applies to the coverage as well as the bandwidth of mobile communication networks. The functions of end-devices and Cloud services are growing day by day. “The new Google Play Cloud service competes with Apple iTunes. There are more and more books, music, films, etc. in the Cloud. All of this can only work if mobile Internet is available everywhere with higher bandwidth.”

“Network operators need to manage the technological transition”

Mini radio cells, so-called Small Cells, complement the bulky radio masts which can certainly supply broadband to a large area, but which can hardly keep up with the growing data flow. There is also a lot of progress being made on the next generation of Small Cells. “At the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, we noticed high-level interest among chip manufacturers and network operators. They’re trying to master a balancing act. On the one hand, they want to equip radio cells with LTE, but at the same time they want to cover UMTS. This is the only way to successfully make the transition from the third to the fourth generation”, adds Stahl. Nash Technologies integrates and tests UMTS and LTE networks. And, as part of the Harvey Nash Group (http://www.harveynash.com), the specialists from Nuremberg are ideally equipped to handle complete projects while the personnel consultants from Harvey Nash source the required additional support.

“The market for Small Cells is still completely open”

“The market for Small Cells is still completely open. Unlike with Cloud providers and end-device suppliers, there aren’t two or three market leaders dominating the market. Asia, Europe and the USA are all involved and over the next few years, we’ll see who is ahead”, says Stahl. One thing is quite sure however: the market for Small Cells is growing dramatically. The Small Cell Forum published new figures at the Mobile World Congress. It is now estimated that the market worldwide will grow from 3.2 million cells in 2012 to over 62 million cells by 2016.

http://www.smallcellforum.org/newsstory-small-cells-to-make-up-almost-90-percent-of-all-base-stations-by-2016

Mobile World Congress: Small Cell demand is set to skyrocket – “UMTS-LTE Dual Mode is the key to growth”

The Mobile World Congress in Barcelona clearly shows that the market for Small Cells will be gathering significant momentum over the years to come. In fact, Simon Saunders, chairman of the Small Cell Forum, estimates that the numbers of Femto Cells deployed worldwide will be increasing from 3.2 million installed units in 2012 to over 60 million in 2016.

http://www.totaltele.com/view.aspx?ID=471674 “Driven by the Smartphone boom, Small Cells are the cornerstone for the next phase of digitalization for all economic sectors – gearing up to the next upswing in the App economy”, confirms Bernd Stahl from the telecommunications provider Nash Technologies on site at the exhibition in Barcelona.

The small radio cells are clearly way ahead of the conventional bulky masts. “They are considerably more cost-effective, their approval processes are less complicated and they can be deployed specifically where there is a high need for bandwidth and where many users communicate at the same time – for instance in football stadiums, inner-city areas or shopping centers”, says Stahl. The Nash Technologies network supplier develops software for companies that produce radio cells – and is most definitely experiencing high-level interest at the Mobile World Congress: “We are having many discussions about these developments, also due to the fact that the Smartphone wave is leading to a heightened need for broadband Internet, which raises the issue of supply”, adds Stahl. And this is just the beginning: “In the future, when the Internet in the key areas of logistics, traffic, health, energy, etc. leads to wide-reaching process digitalization, demand will become even greater.”

Stahl also adds that the introduction of new technologies inevitably implies a transition phase which is not to be underestimated. Whereas most currently developed Small Cells are equipped with LTE, there are hardly any LTE Smartphones. “For the most part, Internet-compatible mobile phones still run with UMTS. And, from a global perspective, this will continue to be the case for quite some time, especially in population-rich, newly industrialized countries and for most users in developed countries. Consequently, the radio cells, and especially Small Cells, need to be equipped with UMTS as well as LTE to enable the transition phase”, says Stahl. And this is exactly why Nash Technologies is present at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. As a telecommunications provider with decades of relevant experience, the software specialists from Nuremberg know their way around LTE, just as well as the considerably more complex world of UMTS. “It’s going to be all about having the different technologies working hand in hand, providing Smartphone users with a seamless transition between both technologies, without their user experience being disrupted”, says Stahl.

Stahl, the ICT expert, is also convinced that, through the development of Small Cells, the App economy will be experiencing its next upswing. Small Cells may only have small geographical coverage. But this makes for a huge benefit: network operators will be aware of exactly where a Smartphone is located, and specifically at locations where it hadn’t been possible previously, because GPS reception wasn’t available in buildings. “When potentially every small business in a downtown area has its own Small Cell, then there’s simply no limit to what can be done. A new type of location-based Apps will be possible, because a business model will be available to support them. Through new Apps, there will be more web traffic and therefore more growth.” To make sure that this growth is also possible during the transition phase from UMTS to LTE, the UMTS-LTE Dual Mode will be key.

For more information, contact:

Bernd Stahl
Senior Systems Architect
Nash Technologies Stuttgart GmbH
ES/VS/E
Lorenzstraße 10
70435 Stuttgart
Email: bernd.stahl@nashtech.com
www.nashtech.com

iPhone: +49 (0) 160 / 97304915
Tel: +49 (0) 711 / 33501-7573
Fax: +49 (0) 711 / 33501-5403

Blog: https://nashtechblog.wordpress.com/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/NashTechGermany
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nash.technologies


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